BOOK REVIEW ~ DEEP BLUE ETERNITY BY NATASHA BOYD

BOOK REVIEW ~ DEEP BLUE ETERNITY BY NATASHA BOYD

Livvy is on the run. And she’s escaped to the one place nobody will ever find her.
But the isolated cottage isn’t empty. Her refuge is home to a troubled stranger, Tom, there for reasons of his own.
In the intimacy of the abandoned cottage, and the remote wilderness of the island, the electrifying connection between them is impossible to ignore. Both running from their histories and shielding dark secrets, their pasts catch up with them and collide in an unimaginable way.
Deep emotions and powerful chemistry face a painful battle with the tangle of lies, and scars of the past. When the truth emerges, hearts will be shattered.

“When I was younger I was asked to describe what I thought love was…Blue and infinite, clear but deep, where no man could truly reach. A deep blue eternity.”
I love this author, love Eversea, and love her writing style, but I’m sad to say this book did not work for me at all. The story ended up being so different from what I thought it would be and no matter how hard I tried to connect, I couldn’t feel any kind of chemistry between the main characters, wasn’t a fan of how convoluted the plot got, and didn’t like the choppily-done timeline riddled with past/present POVs.
I’m going to try to keep this as spoiler-free as possible, though if I accidentally say something that you consider a spoiler, sorry! All negative reviews are spoiler-ish in nature.
“…the idea that I could start over and be someone with no past and no expectations was a heady rush. A complete reinvention of who I was. And I’d be safe.”
Olivia is a troubled teenager on the run. For unknown reasons, her home is unsafe and she escapes to an island cottage only known to her and her deceased sister. When she arrives she finds the hero Tom there living in her cottage and also running from his past. With barely any questions asked and even less answers given, Tom and Olivia live together in their little safe haven.
“She had as much right to be here as I did. And so here we were. Co-existing in this painful kind of hell.”
Very early on, it’s revealed how Tom and Olivia are connected and that knowledge alone was enough to make any romance between them forbidden. Add on the age gap and side character interference (Bethany) and I can see why a relationship would be taboo. However, I never once felt any chemistry between the two. The author did such a great job pronouncing their age gap that Olivia looked extremely childish compared to Tom. She was this chick who had sass and an attitude that got old quick and just naturally made her unapproachable and Tom – despite his heartbreaking past and connection to Olivia and her family – was rather bland and had so much potential but was an underdeveloped character.
The story had a quiet intensity to it, and I never really knew what direction it was going in which wasn’t a bad thing. But I wanted the romance to kick in sooner with a lesser focus on side plots, and believe me, there were many. So many hidden layers to this story, so much drama that it drowned out the romance for me.
“…there was no such thing as white lies. All lies were black and destructive. A white lie was truly the blackest of all.”
Another thing I noticed was that when the time came for plot twists and surprise reveals, they were inserted at the most random places, always making me stop and having to read the page twice. Some might find that to be a good thing, but for me it didn’t feel clever at all. Unless they’re done really well, I’m not a fan of stories that drag out secrets along the way because it makes me feel like there’s an essential piece of the story missing, and knowing that makes it impossible for me to connect to these characters. I wish some things revealed in the latter half of the book were told sooner, which would’ve made me warm up to Olivia and Tom – especially Tom – both individually and as a couple.
Lastly, there was a big drama blowout near the end of the book that got on my nerves, not because I thought it wasn’t needed but because of who instigated it – it was a side character who had previously only taken up 2% of the book. It was really out of the blue! Like out of all the people to play the ‘bad guy’ it had to be this person who was rarely mentioned, never developed, and a flimsy character overall. I also didn’t like how the end of the book didn’t wrap up loose ends with Olivia and Tom’s families. They were such a big part of shaping these characters into who they were in present day, so I was really disappointed to not get that closure.
There are many heavy and sensitive themes in the story but all were addressed and done well, so that was a plus. I also loved the soothing setting of the story and the author’s writing, but other than that, the lackluster romance and plot events I didn’t see eye to eye with made this book a big miss for me.
“She was my deep blue eternity. She was young, but her heart was a thousand years old. Mine was too. And a thousand years from now, she’d still be in it.”
Deep Blue Eternity is a suspenseful romance standalone unrelated to this author’s other books.
Rating: 2.5 stars!
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